September182014
“IT ONLY HAD 1 HP LEFT I WAS SO CLOSE ARE YOU FUCKING KIDDING ME” Every person who has ever played a videogame ever (via its-a-funyarinpa)

(Source: stansusedbloggingemporium, via sifaseven)

September172014

(Source: johnblacksad, via kariagonking)

4PM
roachpatrol:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here
I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”
Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.
The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.
Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

FINALLY AN EXPLANATION

roachpatrol:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here

I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”

Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.

The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.

Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

FINALLY AN EXPLANATION

(via multitaskerme)

September122014

withasingleballoon:

He is respected throughout the Jedi Order for his insight as well as his warrior skill. He has become the hero of the next generation of Padawans; he is the Jedi their Masters hold up as a model. He is the being that the Council assigns to their most important missions. He is modest, centered, and always kind. He is the ultimate Jedi.

- Matthew Stover, Star Wars: Episode III, Revenge of the Sith

(via sifaseven)

September112014

ebriosa:

Rehn’s SWTOR Tanking Guide for Beginners (and also cheerleading to get you to tank)

This is something I’ve been working on for a while, by way of advice typed and talked here and there. My background isn’t super hardcore raiding. I RP’ed and was never max level in WoW. I frolicked in LotRO. I joined an RP/PVE guild that initially had too many tanks. But when Terror from Beyond initially dropped, I stepped up to fill a missing tank spot and have been tanking ever since. I’ve done everything except nightmare tfb and s&v right now, but more importantly I’ve been paying a lot of attention to tanking and I love it. I really would like to see more people trying out the role. It’s not that hard! It’s fun!

But I’ve never read a guide that I thought “Hey, when I first started tanking, that would have been super useful, even if I now appreciate it. Or I would have liked its simplicity at first, but I also need something to also bridge the ‘for dummies’ to the technical stuff.”

I’ve tried to include some short versions and tl:dr’s as I don’t like to say a thing without saying why.

Read More

September102014

firelorcl:

i scare people lots because i walk very softly and they don’t hear me enter rooms so when they turn around i’m just kind of there and their fear fuels me

(via thedefenderoftheearth)

same 

September52014

Fear.
'That lump in your throat? It's panic. Think on what will happen next.'
Then… the mind shatters.’
'I can't take it anymore. Please, make it stop—I give up!'
'The weak surrender quickly.'

(Source: sirenofvathraki)

September42014

"Did you know that Ardun Kothe was controlling me? I was his puppet!”

"That was unfortunate, and unplanned. The Sith wanted you under control. You survived Darth Jadus; how long before you defied another on the Dark Council? The programming was a safeguard, and if I hadn’t approved it, you’d be dead.”

… He was trying to protect me. To keep me safe. I just know it….

(Source: sirenofvathraki)

September32014

'Keyword: onomatophobia. Thesh protocol, phase one.’

' W H A T  H A V E  Y O U  D O N E  T O  M E ?

(Source: , via sirenofvathraki)

2AM
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